recover


recover
recover 1 Recover, regain, retrieve, recoup, recruit can mean to get back something that has been let go or lost.
Recover, the most comprehensive of these terms, may imply a finding or obtaining something material or immaterial that has been lost
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recover a lost watch

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recovered his health

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recover peace of mind

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recovered his balance

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or a getting of something in reparation or compensation
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recover damages in a lawsuit

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Regain, though often used interchangeably with recover, carries a stronger implication of winning back or getting once more into one's possession something of which one has been deprived
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regain a fortress

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regain a person's good will

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regained his sight

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regained freedom

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Regain also may imply, as recover seldom implies, success in reaching again a place or point at which one has been before
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in his efforts to regain his hotel— Meredith

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the trench allowed the performers, after being thrust down into perdition, to regain the greenroom unobserved— Quiller-Couch

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Retrieve implies a recovering or regaining after assiduous effort or search
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desperate efforts to retrieve lost territory

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it now seemed impossible to retrieve the foreign trade lost by war

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his desire to retrieve his military reputation— Belloc

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marveling at the silent untiring activity with which her popularity had been retrievedWharton

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But retrieve sometimes takes for its object such words as loss, error, failure, or disaster, then implying not recovery but a setting right or a making what is bad good, or a reparation by making up for what was wrong or unsuccessful
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life is not long enough to retrieve so many mistakes

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one false step is ne'er retrievedGray

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he is to retrieve his father's failure, to recover the lost gentility of a family that had once been proud— Brooks

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Recoup, basically a legal term implying a rightful deduction by a defendant of part of a claim awarded to a successful plaintiff in a lawsuit, can in its general and extended use imply recovery or retrieval, usually in equivalent rather than identical form, of something lost
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able to recoup his gambling losses by more careful play

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Elizabeth had lost her venture; but if she was bold, she might recoup herself at Philip's cost— Froude

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Recruit fundamentally implies growth through fresh additions; in military use it can imply an increase in numbers through drafting and enlisting or a filling of vacancies in a force resulting from casualties
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it was his custom to recruit his army with conquered people— Newton

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In more general use it may imply a regaining of what has been lost (as vigor through illness, or money through extravagance or heavy expenditures) by fresh additions or replenishment of the supply
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recruiting his strength with a good plain dinner— Dickens

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[the middle class] is continually recruited from the capitalist families— Shaw

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Analogous words: redeem, reclaim (see RESCUE): *compensate, offset, balance
2 *improve, recuperate, convalesce, gain
Analogous words: restore, refresh, rejuvenate, *renew: revive, resuscitate, revivify (see RESTORE)

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • recover — re‧cov‧er [rɪˈkʌvə ǁ ər] verb 1. [intransitive] to increase or improve after falling in value or getting worse: • Its shares plunged at the start of trading, but recovered to close only slightly down. 2. [transitive] FINANCE to get back money… …   Financial and business terms

  • Recover — Re*cov er (r?*k?v ?r), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Recovered} ( ?rd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Recovering}. ] [OE. recoveren, OF. recovrer, F. recouvrer, from L. recuperare; pref. re re + a word of unknown origin. Cf.{Recuperate}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To get or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • recover — re·cov·er /ri kə vər/ vt 1: to get back or get back an equivalent for recover costs through higher prices 2 a: to obtain or get back (as damages, satisfaction for a debt, or property) through a judgment or decree recover damages in a tort action… …   Law dictionary

  • recover — [ri kuv′ər] vt. [ME recoveren < OFr recovrer < L recuperare: see RECUPERATE] 1. a) to get back (something lost or stolen) b) to regain (health, consciousness, etc.) 2. to compensate for; make up for [to recover losses] 3 …   English World dictionary

  • Recover — Re*cov er (r?*k?v ?r), v. i. 1. To regain health after sickness; to grow well; to be restored or cured; hence, to regain a former state or condition after misfortune, alarm, etc.; often followed by of or from; as, to recover from a state of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • recover — c.1300, to regain consciousness, from Anglo Fr. rekeverer (late 13c.), O.Fr. recovrer, from L. recuperare to recover (see RECUPERATION (Cf. recuperation)). Meaning to regain health or strength is from early 14c.; sense of to get (anything) back… …   Etymology dictionary

  • recover — [v1] find again balance, bring back, catch up, compensate, get back, make good, obtain again, offset, reacquire, recapture, reclaim, recoup, recruit, redeem, rediscover, regain, reoccupy, repair, replevin, replevy, repossess, rescue, restore,… …   New thesaurus

  • Recover — Re*cov er, n. Recovery. Sir T. Malory. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Recover — Re*cov er (r?*k?v ?r), v. t. [Pref. re + cover: cf. F. recouvrir.] To cover again. Sir W. Scott. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • recover — recover,   Synonym für restore …   Universal-Lexikon


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